Introduction

Another companion was Hazrat Khalid bin Bukair (ra), who was a Badri companion [those who took part in the Battle of Badr]. Hazrat Khalid bin Bukair, Aaqil, Hazrat Amir and Hazrat Ayaas all accepted Islam in Dar-e-Arqam. All four brothers were the first to accept Islam in Dar-e-Arqam. The Holy Prophet (sa) established a bond of brotherhood between Hazrat Khalid (ra) bin Bukair and Hazrat Zaid (ra) bin Dathinah. He took part in the Battle of Badr and the Battle of Uhud. Hazrat Khalid (ra) bin Bukair was among those who were martyred in the incident that took place in Rajee‘ which has been mentioned earlier in which ten Muslims were deceived and killed.

(At-Tabaqat Al-Kubra, Vol. 3, p.297, Aaqil bin Abi Al-Bukair, Khalid bin Abi Al-Bukair, Darul-kutub-ul-Illmiyah, 1990, Beirut).

Hazrat Utbah (ra) bin Ghazwan’s titles were Abu Abdullah and Abu Ghazwan. Hazrat Utbah (ra) was a confederate of the Banu Naufal bin Abd Manaf. His father’s name was Ghazwan bin Jabir. Aside from Abu Abdullah, Hazrat Utbah’s (ra) other title was Abu Ghazwan – as mentioned earlier. Hazrat Utbah (ra) was married to Ardah bint Harith. Hazrat Utbah (ra) narrates, “I was the seventh person who accepted the Holy Prophet (sa) and joined him.”

First of these is Hazrat Subai bin Qais bin Eesha. His grandfather’s name has been variably written as Absa or Easha. He was from among the Ansar [inhabitants of Medina] and belonged to the tribe Khazraj. He participated in battles of Badr and Uhud.

(Usdul Ghaaba, Vol. 2, p. 407, Subai bin Qais, Dar-ul-Kutub-ul-Ilmiyyah, 1996, Beirut), (At-Tabaqat Al-Kubra, Vol. 3, p. 403, Subai bin Qaid and Abada bin Qais, Da-ul-Kutub Al-Ilmiyyah, 1990, Beirut)

Hazrat Saeed (ra) bin Zaid. Hazrat Saeed’s father’s name was Zaid bin Amr and his mother’s name was Fatima bint Ba‘jah. He belonged to the tribe of Adiyy bin Ka‘b bin Lu‘ayy. The title of Hazrat Saeed (ra) bin Zaid was Abul Awar, while some have also reported it as Abu Thaur. He was tall, of a wheat-coloured complexion and had thick hair. He was the paternal cousin of Hazrat Umar (ra) bin Khattab. His ancestry connects with Hazrat Umar (ra) in the fourth generation through Nufail and connects to the Holy Prophet (sa) in the eighth generation through Ka‘b bin Lu‘ayy.

(Usdul Ghabah, Vol. 2, p. 476, Saeed bin Zaid, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 2003) (al-Tabaqaat-ul-Kubra li ibn Sa‘d, Vol. 3, p. 292, 294, Saeed bin Zaid wa min Bani Asiyy bin Ka‘b bin Lu‘ayy, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 1990) (Roshan Sitarey az Ghulam Bari Saif Sahib, Vol. 2, p. 155)

Hazrat Saeed’s (ra) sister, Atikah, was married to Hazrat Umar (ra) bin Khattab while Hazrat Umar’s (ra) sister, Fatima, was married to Hazrat Saeed (ra). She is that same sister who became a means of Hazrat Umar’s (ra) conversion to Islam.

Then, there is a Companion by the name Hazrat Yazeed bin Munzir bin Sarh bin Khunaas. He belonged to the tribe of Banu Khazraj and he participated in the Bai‘at [pledge of allegiance] taken at ‘Uqba. The Holy Prophet (sa) formed a bond of brotherhood between Hazrat Yazeed bin Munzir and Amir bin Rabee‘a. He participated in the battles of Badr and Uhud. He had no children at the time of his death. His brother, Maqir bin Munzir, also participated in the Bai‘at taken at ‘Uqba as well as the battles of Badr and Uhud.

(At-Tabaqat Al-Kubra, Vol. 3, p. 473, Yazeed bin Munzir, Da-ul-Kutub Al-Ilmiyyah, 1990, Beirut), (Usdul Ghaaba, Vol. 5, p. 473, Yazeed bin Munzir, Dar-ul-Kutub-ul-Ilmiyyah, Beirut)

Hazrat Sa‘d bin Abi Waqas’ title was Abu Ishaq. His father’s name was Malik bin Uhaib, and according to other narrations was Malik bin Wuhaib. However, his father was more prominently known by his title of Abu Waqas, hence his name is Sa‘d bin Abi Waqas. His mother’s name was Hamna bint Sufyan.

(Al-Isti‘ab, Vol. 2, pp. 606-607, Dar-ul-Jeel, Beirut) (Al-Tabaqaat-ul-Kubra li ibn Sa‘d, Vol. 3, p. 101, Sa‘d (ra) bin Abi Waqas, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 1990) Hazrat Sa‘d bin Abi Waqas(ra) belonged to the Banu Zuhrah from the Quraish. (Sirat Khatamun-Nabiyyin, Hazrat Mirza Bashir Ahmad (ra), p. 123) (Sirat ibn Hisham, Vol. 1, pp. 680-681, Min Bani Zuhrah, Maktabah Mustafa al-Babi wa al-Halabi wa Awladuhu, Egypt, 1955)

Hazrat Zubair bin al Awwam’s (ra) father was Awwam bin Khuwailid and his mother’s name was Safia bint Abdul Muttalib (ra), who was the paternal aunt of the Holy Prophet (sa). Hazrat Zubair’s (ra) lineage connects with the Holy Prophet (sa) through Qusai bin Kilab.

Hazrat Zubair (ra) was the nephew of Hazrat Khadija (ra), the wife of the Holy Prophet (sa). Hazrat Zubair (ra) was married to Hazrat Asmaa (ra), the daughter of Hazrat Abu Bakr (ra) and the Holy Prophet (sa) was married to the other daughter of Hazrat Abu Bakr (ra), Hazrat Aisha (ra). In this way, the Holy Prophet (sa) and Hazrat Zubair (ra) were married to two sisters. Thus, Hazrat Zubair (ra) had numerous family ties with the Holy Prophet (sa).

Then, there is Hazrat Marsad bin Abi Marsad. He passed away during the month of Safar [second month of the lunar calendar] in the third year of Hijra. He was a companion who participated in the Battle of Badr. He was an ally of Hazrat Hamza bin Abd-il-Muttalib. He participated in the battle of Uhud along with his father.

He accepted Islam in its initial stages and migrated to Medina prior to the Battle of Badr.

The Holy Prophet (sa) formed a bond of brotherhood between him and Hazrat Aus bin Samit.

On the day of [the Battle of] Badr, he arrived on a horse, named Sabal.

Ibn Ishaq has written that Hazrat Marsad, may Allah be pleased with him, was the leader of the group of soldiers, which the Holy Prophet (sa) sent to Raji‘. This incident took place during the month of Safar in the third year of Hijra. According to some, Hazrat ‘Asim bin Thabit was the leader of that group.

(At-Tabaqat Al-Kubra, Vol. 3, p. 35, Abu Marsad, Da-ul-Kutub Al-Ilmiyyah, 1990, Beirut), (Usdul Ghaaba, Vol. 5, p. 133, Marsad bin Abi Marsad, Dar-ul-Kutub-ul-Ilmiyyah, Beirut)

Hazrat Simak (ra) bin Kharasha. Hazrat Abu Dujana (ra) belonged to the Banu Sa‘idah branch of the Khazraj tribe of the Ansar.

Hazrat Abu Dujana’s (ra) father’s name was Kharasha, whilst it has also been reported that his father’s name was Aus and his grandfather was Kharasha. Hazrat Abu Dujana’s (ra) mother’s name was Hazmah bint Harmalah.

Hazrat Abu Dujana (ra) was more commonly known by his title of Abu Dujana than his actual name. Hazrat Abu Dujana (ra) had a son whose name was Khalid and whose mother’s name was Aminah bint Amr.

(Ali Ibn al-Athir, Usd al-Ghabah fi Ma‘rifat al-Sahabah, Vol. 2, Simak bin Kharashah [Beirut, Lebanon: Dar al-Fikr, 2003], 317) (Ibn Saad, Al-Tabaqat al-Kubra, Vol. 3, Abu Dujanah [Beirut, Lebanon: Dar al-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, 1990], 419)

Then, there is a Companion by the name Hazrat Khawarja bin Humayyar Ashja‘i. There are many differing opinions with regards to his name. Ibn Ishaq has mentioned his name as Khawarja bin Humayyar, Musa bin ‘Uqba has mentioned his name as Haritha bin Humayyar, Waqidi has mentioned his name as Hamza bin Humayyar. There is also a difference of opinion with relation to the name of his father. Some have stated his name as Humayyar, whereas others have written it as Jumaira and Jumair. Nevertheless, everyone agrees on the fact that he belonged to the tribe of Ashja‘, which was an ally of the tribe of Banu Khazraj. His brother’s name is ‘Abdullah bin Humayyar, who participated alongside him in the Battle of Badr.

(Al-Asaba Fi Tameez Al-Sahaba, Vol. 1, p. 704, Haritha bin Humayyar, Da-ul-Kutub Al-Ilmiyyah, 1995, Beirut), (Usdul Ghaaba, Vol. 1, p. 649, Haritha bin Khumayyar, Dar-ul-Kutub-ul-Ilmiyyah, Beirut)

The next companion to be mentioned is Hazrat Ubayy (ra) bin Kaab. Hazrat Ubayy (ra) belonged to the Banu Muawiyah branch of the Khazraj tribe of the Ansar. His father’s name was Kaab bin Qais and his mother’s name was Suhaila bint Aswad. Hazrat Ubayy (ra) bin Kaab had two titles; one was Abu Munzir, as given by the Holy Prophet (sa) and the second was Abu Tufail, given by Hazrat Umar (ra) because of his son, Tufail.

(Ali Ibn al-Athir, Usd al-Ghabah fi Ma‘rifat al-Sahabah, Vol. 1 [Beirut, Lebanon: Maktabat Dar al-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, 2016] 168-169)

Hazrat Bishr bin Bara bin Ma‘rur (ra) belonged to the Banu Ubaid bin Adiyy of the Khazraj tribe of the Ansar. According to another narration, he belonged to Banu Salama; these are two different narrations.

(al-Sirat al-Nabawiyyah li Ibn Hisham, p. 471, al-Ansar wa man ma’ahum, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 2001) (Usdul Ghabah, Vol. 1, p. 380, Bishr bin al-Bara (ra), Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 2008)

Hazrat Bishr’s (ra) father’s name was Hazrat Bara bin Ma‘rur (ra) and the name of his mother was Khulaida bint Qais.

(al-Tabaqaat-ul-Kubra li ibn Sa‘d, Vol. 3, p. 291, Bishr bin al-Bara (ra), Dar Ihyaa al-Turath al-Arabi, Beirut, 1996)

There is a mention of a companion whose name was Haritha bin Suraqah. He passed away in 2 Hijra during the Battle of Badr. His mother, ar-Rubaya' bint al-Nazr was the paternal aunt of Hazrat Anas bin Malik (ra).

(Al-Asaba fi Tameez Al-Sahaba, Vol. 1, p. 704, Harithah Bin Suraqah, Dar-ul-Kutub Al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 1995)

Hazrat Mu‘az (ra) belonged to the Banu Malik bin Najjar clan of the Khazraj tribe of the Ansar. His father’s name was Harith bin Rifa‘ah and his mother’s name was Afraa bint Ubaid. Hazrat Mu‘awwiz (ra) and Hazrat Auf (ra) were his brothers. All three of these brothers used to be referred to by the name of their father as well as their mother. Hence, they were also known as Banu Afraa [the sons of Afraa].

Then there is companion by the name of Hazrat Mulail bin Wabra. Different versions of his name are recorded, but Ibn Ishaq and Abu Naeem have both written his name as Mulail bin Wabra bin Abdul Karim bin Khalid bin Ajla. On the other hand, Umar and Kalbi have written it as Malail bin Wabra bin Khalid bin Ajlaan, omitting Abdul Karim. He also belonged to the tribe Khazraj, his branch was Banu Ajlaan. He took part in the battles of Badr and Uhud, both.

(Usdul Ghaaba, Vol. 5, p. 251, Mulail bin Wabra, Dar-ul-Kutub-ul-Ilmiyyah, Beirut)

Hazrat Ammar bin Yasir (ra) was an early and devout companion of the Holy Prophet (sa). His father, Hazrat Yasir (ra), was of Qahtani descent and originally from Yemen. He came to Mecca, along with his two brothers, Haris and Malik, in search of their brother. Haris and Malik returned to Yemen, while Hazrat Yasir (ra) took up residence in Mecca and was an associate of Abu Huzaifah Makhzumi. Abu Huzaifah married him to his bondswoman, Hazrat Sumaiyyah. Hazrat Ammar (ra) was born out of that wedlock. Hazrat Ammar (ra) and Hazrat Yasir (ra) stayed with Abu Huzaifah until his demise.

Hazrat Khubaib (ra) bin Adiyy Ansari belonged to the Banu Jahjabah of the Aus tribe from among the Ansar.

(Usdul Ghaba, Vol. 1, p. 681, Khubaib (ra) bin Adiyy, Dar-ul-Fikr, 2003)

Then, there is Hazrat Ansa (ra). He passed away during the battle of Badr. However, there are different opinions in relation to this as some say that he was alive until the Khilafat of Hazrat Abu Bakr (ra). Nevertheless, he was a freed, Abyssinian slave of the Holy Prophet (sa). His name was Ansa and it can also be found as Abu Ansa. Similarly, according to some, his title was Abu Masrooh.

Then, there is Hazrat Ab-uz-Zayyah bin Thabit bin Nu‘man. He passed away in the seventh year of Hijra. In one narration, his name has been mentioned as ‘Umair bin Thabit bin Nu‘man bin Umayyah bin Imra-ul-Qais. According to another narration it is Nu‘man bin Thabit bin Imra-ul-Qais. He was known by his title, Ab-uz-Zayyah.

Hazrat Hubbab bin Munzir Bin Jumuh was a Companion who passed away during the Khilafat of Hazrat ‘Umar. He was with the Holy Prophet (sa) during Badr, Uhud, Khandaq and all other battles. He remained resolute alongside the Holy Prophet (sa) during the battle of Uhud and pledged to the Holy Prophet (sa) to offer his life.

(Usdul Ghaaba, Vol. 1, p. 665, Hubbab bin Munzir, Dar-ul-Kutub-ul-Ilmiyyah, Beirut), (At-Tabaqat Al-Kubra, Vol. 3, p. 428, Hubbab bin Munzir, Da-ul-Kutub Al-Ilmiyyah, 1990, Beirut)

Hazrat Amr (ra) bin Ma‘bad’s name is also reported as Umair (ra) bin Ma‘bad. His father’s name was Ma‘bad bin Az‘ar. Hazrat Amr (ra) bin Ma‘bad belonged to the Banu Zubaya branch of the Aus tribe of the Ansar.

(Al-Sirat al-Nabawiyyah li Ibn Hisham, p. 465, Baab Al-Ansar wa man ma’ahum, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 2001)

The actual name of Hazrat Abu Talha Ansari (ra) was Zaid. He belonged to the Ansar tribe of Khazraj and was the chief of his tribe and he was more commonly known by his title of Abu Talha. The name of Hazrat Abu Talha’s (ra) father was Sahl bin Aswad and the name of his mother was Ubada bint Malik. Hazrat Abu Talha (ra) had the opportunity to pledge initiation at the hands of the Holy Prophet (sa) during the second pledge at Aqabah. He participated alongside the Holy Prophet (sa) in all the battles, including the Battle of Badr. When Hazrat Abu Ubaidah (ra) bin al-Jarrah migrated to Medina, the Holy Prophet (sa) formed a bond of brotherhood between him and Hazrat Abu Talha (ra). Hazrat Abu Talha (ra) was of a wheat colour complexion and of moderate height and he had never dyed his hair or beard; he kept his hair in its natural condition.

(Usdul Ghabah, Vol. 5, pp- 183-184, Abu Talha Ansari (ra), Vol. 2, p. 150, Zaid bin Sahl, Dar-ul-Fikr, Beirut, 2003)

Another companion was Hazrat Naufil bin Abdullah bin Nazla. He was martyred during the Battle of Uhud. Some have written his name as Naufil bin Salba bin Abdullah bin Nazla bin Malik bin Ajlaan. He took part in the battles of Badr and Uhud. His lineage did not continue either.

(Usdul Ghaaba, Vol. 5, pp. 346-347, Naufil bin Salba, Dar-ul-Kutub-ul-Ilmiyyah, Beirut), (At-Tabaqat Al-Kubra, Vol. 3, p. 415, Da-ul-Kutub Al-Ilmiyyah, 1990, Beirut)

Hazrat Jabir bin Abdullah (ra) was a companion of the Holy Prophet (sa). He was the son of Hazrat Abdullah bin Amr bin Haram. Abdullah bin Amr bin Haram was the same companion about whom I narrated in a Friday sermon a few weeks ago that upon his martyrdom the Holy Prophet (sa) stated, “God Almighty asked him what his wish was, so He may fulfil it?” He replied, “O Allah! My wish is to be granted life again and to be returned to the world, so that I may attain martyrdom again for Your cause.” Since this was against the established practice of God Almighty, He said, “I cannot do this, for the dead cannot be returned to the world.”

(Sunan Al-Tirmidhi, Abwab Tafseer-ul-Quran, Hadith No. 3010)

“Tell me if there is anything else.” Nevertheless, this narration highlights his standard of sacrifice and his exceptional treatment by God Almighty.

Hazrat Jabir bin Abdullah (ra) was the son of a great companion. He had performed Bai‘at [Oath of Initiation] at the occasion of the Second Pledge of al-Aqabah, when he was a young child.

(Usdul Ghabah, Vol. 1, p. 492, Dar-ul-Ilmiyya, Beirut 1996).

During the period of jahiliyyah, Hazrat Abdur Rahman (ra) bin Auf’s name was Abd Amr and according to another narration was Abdul Ka‘bah. After accepting Islam, the Holy Prophet (sa) changed his name to Abdur Rahman. He belonged to the tribe Banu Zuhrah bin Kilab.

(al-Tabaqaat-ul-Kubra li ibn Sa‘d, Vol. 3, p. 92, Abdur Rahman bin Auf, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 1990)

The name of Hazrat Abdullah bin Rawaha’s (ra) father was Rawaha bin Tha‘labah. His mother’s name was Kabshah bint Waqid bin ‘Amr, who belonged to the Banu Harith clan of the Khazraj tribe of the Ansar. Hazrat Abdullah bin Rawaha (ra) participated in the Bai‘at at al-‘Aqabah and was the leader of Bani Harith bin Khazraj. His title was Abu Muhammad. Some have also reported his title as Abu Rawaha and Abu ‘Amr.

(Usdul Ghaba, Vol. 3, p. 235, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 2008)

His title is Abdur-Rahman and he belonged to the tribe of Banu Huzail. His mother’s name was Umm-e-Abd. He passed away in 32 AH. His father’s name was Mas‘ud bin Ghafil. Abdullah bin Mas‘ud is counted among the early converts to Islam. He accepted Islam at the same time as the sister of Hazrat Umar (ra), Hazrat Fatima bint Khattab and her husband, Hazrat Sa‘eed bin Zaid.

(Usdul Ghaba, Vol. 4, p. 129, Dar-ul-Kutub Al-ilmiyyah, Beirut)

Hazrat Abu Lubabah (ra) bin Abdul Munzir is another companion that I will mention. There are varying opinions about his name. Some have reported that his name was Bashir. Ibn-e-Ishaaq states that his name was Rifaa and according to Allama Zamkhashri it was recorded as Marwan. In any case, he was from the Ansar [Muslim inhabitants of Medina] and belonged to a tribe called Aus. He was one of the twelve chiefs and participated in Bai‘at-e-Uqbah.

Some historians have recorded Hazrat Unais’ name as Anas. However, the correct name is Unais. Both Muhammad bin Ishaq and Muhammad bin Umar have written Unais. He was with the Holy Prophet (sa) during the Battle of Badr and was martyred during the Battle of Uhud. He also did not have any children. According to one tradition, Hazrat Khansaa bint Khizam was married to him at the time of his martyrdom.

(Usdul Ghaaba, Vol. 1, pp. 305-306 Unais bin Qitada, Dar-ul-Kutub-ul-Ilmiyyah, Beirut), (At-Tabaqat Al-Kubra, Vol. 3, pp. 353-354, Dar-ul-Kutub Al-Ilmiyyah, 1990, Beirut)

Hazrat Umair bin Abi Waqqas participated in the Battle of Badr. His father was Abu Waqas Malik bin Uhaib. He was martyred during the Battle of Badr in 2 AH.

Hazrat Umair (ra) was the younger brother of Hazrat Sa‘d bin Abi Waqas and was among the early Muslims. His mother’s name was Hamnah bint Sufyan. He belonged to the Banu Zuhrah tribe of the Quraish. As it has been mentioned, he participated in the Battle of Badr and attained martyrdom.

Hazrat Sa‘d (ra) bin Ubadah belonged to the tribe of Banu Sa‘idah, which was a branch of the Khazraj tribe of the Ansar. His father’s name was Ubadah bin Dulaim and mother’s name was Umrah (ra), who was the third daughter of Mas‘ud bin Qais. His mother also had the honour of pledging allegiance to the Holy Prophet (sa). Hazrat Sa‘d (ra) bin Ubadah was the maternal cousin of Hazrat Sa‘d (ra) bin Zaid Ashhali, who was from among the Badri companions (ra). Hazrat Sa‘d (ra) had two marriages. One of his wives was Ghazia bint Sa‘d to whom Saeed, Muhammad and Abdur Rahman were born. The second wife was Fuqayha bint Ubaid to whom Qais, Umamah and Sadoos were born.

(Al-Tabaqaat-ul-Kubra li ibn Sa‘d, Vol. 3, pp. 460-461, Sa‘d bin Ubadah, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 1990)

Mandus (ra) bint Ubadah was the sister of Hazrat Sa‘d bin Ubadah, who pledged allegiance to the Holy Prophet (sa) and accepted Islam. Hazrat Sa‘d (ra) bin Ubadah had another sister whose name was Laila (ra) bint Ubadah and she also had the honour of pledging allegiance to the Holy Prophet (sa) and entering the fold of Islam.

(Al-Tabaqaat-ul-Kubra li ibn Sa‘d, Vol. 8, pp. 277, Wa min Bani Sa‘idah ibn Ka‘b bin al-Khazraj, Mandus bint Ubadah, Layla bint Ubadah, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 1990)

Hazrat Sa‘d (ra) bin Ubadah’s title was Abu Thabit and it has also been reported as Abu Qais, however the former seems more authentic and correct. Hazrat Sa‘d (ra) bin Ubadah was a guardian for the Khazraj tribe of the Ansar. Hazrat Sa‘d (ra) bin Ubadah was a leader of his people and extremely generous. He held the flag of the Ansar in all the battles he participated in. Hazrat Sa‘d (ra) bin Ubadah was held in great esteem and considered among the leaders of his people in Medina and he was regarded for his leadership by his people.

(Usdul Ghabah, Vol. 3, p. 441, Sa‘d bin Ubadah, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 2003)

During the era of ignorance [era prior to the advent of Islam], Hazrat Sa‘d (ra) bin Ubadah knew how to write in Arabic, even though very few people in that time could write. He was also very skilled in swimming and archery. Anyone who possessed these qualities would be known as kamil.

Hazrat Talha (ra) belonged to the Banu Taym bin Murrah tribe. His father’s name was Ubaidullah bin Uthman and the name of his mother was Sa‘bah (ra), who was the daughter of Abdullah bin Imad Hazrami and was the sister of Hazrat Alaa (ra) bin Hazrami. Hazrat Talha’s title was Abu Muhammad. The name of Hazrat Alaa (ra) bin Hazrami’s father was Abdullah bin Imad Hazrami.

Then, there is Hazrat Abu Kabsha Sulaim. His title is Abu Kabsha. He passed away during the Khilafat of Hazrat ‘Umar. According to some, his name was Salama. He was a freed, Persian slave of the Holy Prophet (sa). He is a companion who participated in the Battle of Badr. He was born in the area of Aus. There are various narrations regarding his birthplace and lineage. Some consider him to be Persian, others consider him to be Dausi and others consider him to be from Mecca. He accepted Islam in the very early stages and migrated to Medina after receiving permission to do so. He fought alongside the Holy Prophet (sa) during every battle, including the battle of Badr.

(Al-Asaba Fi Tameez Al-Sahaba, Vol. 7, p. 284, Abu Kabsha, Da-ul-Kutub Al-Ilmiyyah, 1995, Beirut), (Sira Al-Sahaba, Shah Muin-ul-din Ahmad Nadwi, Vol. 2, pt. 2, p. 579, Dar-ul-Isha’at, Karachi)

There is a companion named Hazrat Suleet bin Qais bin ‘Amar. He passed away in 14th Hijri. His full name was Hazrat Suleet bin Qais bin ‘Amar bin ‘Ubaid bin Malik. After accepting Islam, both Hazrat Sulaeet bin Qais and Hazrat Abu Salma destroyed the idols of the family of Banu ‘Adi bin Najjaar.

Hazrat Bilal’s (ra) father’s name was Rabah and his mother’s name was Hamamah. Hazrat Bilal (ra) was a slave of Umayyah bin Khalf. His title was Abu Abdullah however, according to other narrations, it is also mentioned as Abu Abdur Rahman, Abu Abdul Karim and Abu Amr. Hazrat Bilal’s (ra) mother was from Abyssinia while his father was from Arabia.

Historians have written that he was of Abyssinian Semite descent. In ancient times, certain Semitic or some Arab tribes migrated to Africa and settled there. Due to this, the complexion of their offspring resembled the natives of that region, but the specific characteristics and habits that are found in the people of that region were not adopted by them. Later on, some of them returned to Arabia as slaves. Since they were of a dark complexion, the Arabs used to think of them as Habshi, i.e., people of Abyssinia.

According to one narration, Hazrat Bilal (ra) was born in Mecca and was among the muwallideen. Those who were not of a purely Arab descent used to be referred to as muwallideen. According to another narration, he was born in Surat, situated close to Yemen and Abyssinia where many mixed-race people lived.

(Ibn Sa‘d, Al-Tabaqat al-Kubra, Vol. 3, Bilal bin Rabah [Beirut, Lebanon: Dar al-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, 2017] 174-175) (Ali Ibn al-Athir, Usd al-Ghabah fi Ma‘rifat al-Sahabah, Vol. 1, Bilal bin Rabah [Beirut, Lebanon: Dar al-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, 2008] 415) (Roshan Satarey az Ghulam Bari Saif Sahib, Vol. 1, p. 145) (Ali Ibn al-Athir, Usd al-Ghabah fi Ma’rifat al-Sahabah [Mutarjam] Vol. 1 [Maktabah Khalil] 283)

Hazrat Mus‘ab (ra) bin Umair belonged to the Banu Abd ad-Daar clan of the Quraish tribe. The title of Hazrat Mus‘ab (ra) bin Umair was Abu Abdullah, and in another narration, it has been reported as Abu Muhammad. Hazrat Mus‘ab’s (ra) father’s name was Umair bin Hashim and his mother’s name was Khannas or Hannas bint Malik who was an affluent lady from Mecca. Hazrat Mus‘ab (ra) bin Umair’s parents loved him dearly.

Hazrat Mus‘ab (ra) bin Umair’s mother brought him up giving him many comforts and luxuries, dressing him in the most expensive and finest attire. He used to wear the most excellent fragrance available in Mecca and wore Hadrami shoes which were made in Hadhramaut and were exclusively for the affluent. Hadhramaut was a vast open plain near the sea, situated to the east of Aden. In any case, he would wear immaculate clothes and use the best fragrance and even his shoes were bought from outside of Mecca.

Hazrat Mus‘ab’s (ra) wife’s name was Hamnah (ra) bint Jahsh, who was the sister of Umm-ul-Momineen Hazrat Zainab (ra) bint Jahsh, the wife of the Holy Prophet (sa). Hazrat Mus‘ab (ra) had one daughter with her. The Holy Prophet(sa) used to remember Mus‘ab (ra) and would say, “I have not seen a more handsome individual than Mus‘ab (ra) and one who was brought up afforded by comforts and luxuries.”

(al-Tabaqaat-ul-Kubra li ibn Sa‘d, Vol. 3, pp. 85-86, Mus‘ab (ra) bin Umair, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 1990) (Usdul Ghabah, Vol. 5, p. 175, Mus‘ab (ra) bin Umair, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 2003) (Siyar as-Sahaba, Vol. 2, Muhajireen part 1, p. 270, 275, Darul Isha’at, Karachi, 2004) (Usdul Ghabah, Vol. 7, p. 71, Hamnah bint Jahsh, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 2003) (Mu‘jamul Buldan, Vol. 2, p. 157, Dar Ihyaa al-Turath al-Arabi, Beirut)

Narration 1

Hazrat Musleh-e-Maud (ra) states:

“Look to Hazrat Abu Bakr (ra) and observe that he was just an ordinary merchant in Mecca. If the Holy Prophet (sa) was not raised as a prophet and the history of Mecca was still recorded, all that would be said about Hazrat Abu Bakr (ra) is that he was a noble and honest Arab merchant. However, for his devotion to the Holy Prophet Muhammad (sa), he attained a rank that granted him respect and reverence around the entire world. When the Holy Prophet (sa) passed away and when the Muslims elected Hazrat Abu Bakr (ra) as their caliph and king, this news spread to Mecca. A large gathering had formed in which the father of Hazrat Abu Bakr (ra), Abu Quhafah, was also present. When he heard that the people had pledged allegiance to Hazrat Abu Bakr (ra), he could not come to terms with it. In astonishment, he asked the news bearer about which Abu Bakr he was referring to. He replied, ‘None other than your son, Abu Bakr.’ He began to site the names of every Arab tribe and asked, ‘Have they also pledged allegiance to Abu Bakr?’ And when he was told that everyone had unanimously chosen Hazrat Abu Bakr (ra) to be their caliph and leader, then Abu Quhafah could not help but to remark:

أَشْهَدُ‭ ‬أَنْ‭ ‬لَّا‭ ‬إِلٰهَ‭ ‬إِلَّا‭ ‬اللّٰهُ‭ ‬وَحْدَهُ‭ ‬لَا‭ ‬شَرِيْـكَ‭ ‬لَهُ‭ ‬وَأَشْهَدُ‭ ‬أَنَّ‭ ‬مُحَمَّدًا‭ ‬عَبْـدُهُ‭ ‬وَرَسُوْلُهُ

“That is, ‘I bear witness that there is none worthy of worship except Allah the Almighty and that the Holy Prophet Muhammad (sa) is His servant and messenger.’”

Hazrat Musleh-e-Maud (ra) continues:

“This was despite the fact that Hazrat Abu Quhafah (ra) was already a Muslim and had pledged allegiance to the Holy Prophet (sa). The reason he recited the declaration of faith and reaffirmed the prophethood of the Holy Prophet (sa) was because the caliphate of Hazrat Abu Bakr (ra) was a stark realisation and he understood this to be a substantial proof of the truthfulness of Islam. [He said], ‘Otherwise, my son was not someone under whom all of Arabia could have united.’”

(Tafsir-e-Kabir, Vol. 6, pp. 205-206)

Narration 2

Whilst mentioning this on another occasion, Hazrat Musleh-e-Maud (ra) states:

“Ponder over the condition of Hazrat Abu Bakr (ra) prior to his acceptance of Islam. His father was still alive when he became the Khalifa and someone congratulated him that Abu Bakr (ra) had become the Khalifa. Upon this, he asked, ‘Which Abu Bakr?’ to which he replied, ‘Your son’. Even then he was not convinced and said it was probably someone else. However, when he was informed that indeed it was Abu Bakr (ra), he proclaimed, ‘Allah is the Greatest! How lofty is the grandeur of Muhammad (sa) in that the son of Abu Quhafah has been accepted by the Arabs as their leader!’ Thus, Abu Bakr (ra) possessed no worldly rank, but he attained such honour owing to his subservience to the Holy Prophet (sa) that even today hundreds of thousands of people are proud to associate themselves with him.”

(Khitab Jalsa Salana 17 March 1919, Anwar-ul-Ulum, Vol. 4, p. 425)

There was a companion of the Holy Prophet Muhammad (sa), whose name was Hazrat Khallad Bin Rafe‘ Zurqi. He was from among the Ansar [inhabitants of Medina] and those fortunate people who participated in the Battles Badr and Uhud. God Almighty granted him many children.

(At-Tabaqat Al-Kubra, Vol. 3, p. 447, Khallad Bin Rafe‘, Dar Ihya At-turath Al-Arabi, 1990, Beirut)

His name was Mu‘az and the name of his father was Jabal bin Amr and his mother was Hind bint Sahl, who belonged to the Banu Raba‘ah branch of the Juhaynah tribe.

Hazrat Mu‘az (ra) bin Jabal’s title was Abdur-Rahman and he belonged to the Uday bin Sa‘d bin Ali branch of the Khazraj tribe. The author of Siyar-us-Sahabah [life of the companions] writes that Sa‘d bin Ali had two sons, Salama and Uday. Banu Salama is the progeny of Salama.

During the era of Islam, only two individuals from the progeny of Uday bin Sa‘d survived; they were Hazrat Mu‘az (ra) and his son, Abdur-Rahman. The houses of Banu Uday were situated in the neighbourhood of Banu Salama.

Another companion is Hazrat Wadee‘a bin Amar. Ibn Kalbi has written his name as Wadee‘a bin Amar bin Yasaar bin Auf, whereas Abu Ma‘shar calls him Rifa‘a bin Amar bin Jarraad. He belonged to the tribe Banu Juhaina which was aligned with Banu Najaar. He took part in battles of Badr and Uhud. Hazrat Rabee‘a bin Amar was his brother.

(At-Tabaqat Al-Kubra, Vol. 3, p. 377, Wadee’a bin Amar, Da-ul-Kutub Al-Ilmiyyah, 1990, Beirut), (Al-Asaba Fi Tameez Al-Sahaba, Vol. 2, p. 392, Rabee’a bin Amar, Da-ul-Kutub Al-Ilmiyyah, 1995, Beirut)

The name of Hazrat Abu Ubaidah (ra) bin Jarrah was Aamir bin Abdullah. His father’s name was Abdullah bin Jarrah. Hazrat Abu Ubaidah (ra) was more commonly by known his title which was the name of his grandfather, Jarrah. His mother’s name was Umaimah bint Ghanam. He belonged to the Banu Harith bin Fihr tribe of the Quraish.

(Ibn Hajar al-Asqalani, al-Isabah fi Tamyiz al-Sahabah, Vol. 3, Amir bin ‘Abd-Allah [Beirut, Lebanon: Dar al-Kutub al-‘Ilmiyyah, 2005] 475)

The first thing to be remembered in relation to Hazrat Uthman (ra) is that he did not personally take part in the Battle of Badr. However, he was among those eight fortunate companions who were given a portion of the spoils of war by the Holy Prophet (sa) and were, as such, considered to have taken part in the battle.

His name was Uthman bin Affan bin Ab-il-As bin Umayyah bin Abd Shams bin Abd Manaf bin Qusayy bin Kilab. As such, his ancestry connects to the Holy Prophet (sa) in the fifth generation through Abd Manaf.

The name of Hazrat Suhaib’s (ra) father was Sinan bin Malik and his mother’s name was Salama bint Qaeed. Hazrat Suhaib(ra) was from Mosul.

Hazrat Suhaib’s father, or his uncle, was the governor of Ubullah for the Chosroes. Ubullah is a city on the banks of the Tigris River, which later came to be known as Basra. The Romans attacked that region and took Hazrat Suhaib (ra) as a prisoner when he was a child.

According to Abul Qasim al-Maghrabi, Hazrat Suhaib’s (ra) actual name was Umairah, but the Romans named him “Suhaib”.

(al-Tabaqaat-ul-Kubra li ibn Sa‘d, Vol. 3, pp. 169-170, Suhaib bin Sinaan, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 2017) (al-Isabah Fi Tamyeez al-Sahabah, Vol. 4, pp. 33-34, Suhaib bin Sinaan, Dar-ul-Fikr, Beirut, 2001) (Mu‘jamul Buldan, Vol. 1, p. 99, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut)

Hazrat Amr (ra) bin Ma‘bad’s name is also reported as Umair (ra) bin Ma‘bad. His father’s name was Ma‘bad bin Az‘ar. Hazrat Amr (ra) bin Ma‘bad belonged to the Banu Zubaya branch of the Aus tribe of the Ansar.

(Al-Sirat al-Nabawiyyah li Ibn Hisham, p. 465, Baab Al-Ansar wa man ma’ahum, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 2001)

Today, I will speak about Hazrat Hamza (ra) bin Abdul Muttalib. A detailed account of him, in particular the way he converted to Islam, has been given in history and in the Ahadith. The same is true for the incident of his martyrdom.

He was known by the title of Sayyidush-Shuhadaa [The Chief of the Martyrs]. Asadullah [The Lion of Allah] and Asadur-Rasul [The Lion of the Prophet] were accolades also given to him.

Hazrat Hamza (ra) was the son of Hazrat Abdul Muttalib, the leader of the Quraish and the paternal uncle of the Messenger of Allah. The name of the mother of Hazrat Hamza (ra) was Hallah, who was also the paternal cousin of the Prophet’s mother, Hazrat Aminah. Hazrat Hamza (ra) was two years older than the Holy Prophet (sa) or four years according to another narration.

(Isti‘ab, Vol. 1, p.369, Hamza bin Abdil-Muttalib, Darul Jalil, 1992, Beirut), (Usdul Ghaaba, Vol. 2, p.67, Hamza bin Abdil-Muttalib, Darul-Kutub Al-‘Ilmiyyah, 1996, Beirut)

Hazrat Hamza (ra) was also a foster brother of the Holy Prophet (sa). A bondwoman, named Thaubia, had nursed both of them.

(Sharah Zarqani, Vol. 4, p.499, Bab Zikru Munaqibul Abbas, Darul-Kutub Al-‘Ilmiyyah, 1996, Beirut)

There was a companion whose name was Hazrat Suwaad bin Ghaziyyah (ra) who was an Ansari and was from the Banu ‘Adi bin Najjar tribe. He took part in the battles of Badr, Uhud, Khandaq and the battles that took place afterwards. He imprisoned Khalid bin Hisham Makhzoomi in the battle of Badr.

Hazrat Muawiz (ra) belonged to the Khazraj tribe of the Ansar. Hazrat Muawiz’s (ra) father’s name was Harith bin Rifa‘ah. His mother’s name was Afraa bint Ubaid. Hazrat Muaz (ra) and Hazrat Auf (ra) were his brothers. All three of these brothers used to be referred to by the name of their father as well as their mother. Hence, all three were also known as Banu Afraa [the sons of Afraa].

(Ali Ibn al-Athir, Usd al-Ghabah fi Ma‘rifat al-Sahabah, Vol. 5, Muawiz bin Afra [Beirut, Lebanon: Dar al-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, 2003] 231) (Ibn Saad, Al-Tabaqat al-Kubra, Vol. 3, Muawiz bin Afra (Beirut, Lebanon: Dar al-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, 1990), 374.)

Then, there is a companion Hazrat ‘Abbad bin Qais. He also passed away in the eighth year of Hijra during the Battle of Mautah. There are some differing opinions in relation to his name as well. His name can be found as Ubbada bin Qais bin ‘Eisha. Similarly, the name of his grandfather is also mentioned as ‘Abasa. Hazrat ‘Abbad was the paternal uncle of Hazrat Abu Dardaa (ra).

Today, I will speak about Hazrat Umar (ra) bin al-Khattab. Hazrat Umar (ra) belonged to the tribe of Banu Adi bin Kaab bin Lu‘ayy. His father’s name was Al-Khattab bin Nufail and according to one narration, the name of his mother was Hantama bint Hashim. As such, his mother would be the paternal cousin of Abu Jahl.

Hazrat Ubaidah bin al-Harith, who belonged to Banu Muttalib, was a close relative of the Holy Prophet (sa). He belonged to the tribe of Banu Muttalib. His title was Abu Harith, whereas, according to others, it was Abu Muawiyyah. The name of his mother was Sukhaila bint Khuzai. Hazrat Ubaidah was ten years older than the Holy Prophet (sa). He was among the first people to accept Islam and became a Muslim before the Holy Prophet (sa) went to Dar-e Arqam. Hazrat Abu Ubaidah, Hazrat Abu Salama bin Abdillah Asadi, Hazrat Abdullah bin Arqam Makhzumi and Hazrat Uthman bin Maz‘un, all became Muslim at the same time. The Holy Prophet (sa) held Hazrat Ubaidah in great honour and esteem. Hazrat Ubaidah bin Harith accepted Islam in its early stages and was among the chiefs of Banu Abdi Manaf.

(Usdul Ghaba, Vol. 5, p. 547, Ubaidah bin Harith, Dar-ul-Kutb al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 2003), (al-Asaaba Fi Tameez al-Sahaba, Vol. 4, p. 353, Ubaidah bin Harith, Dar-ul-Kutb al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 1995).

Hazrat Qais bin Abi Sa‘sa was an Ansari [inhabitant of Medina]. The father of Hazrat Qais was Amr bin Zaid, however he was more commonly known by the title of Abu Sa‘sa. Hazrat Qais’ mother’s name was Shaibah bint Asim. Hazrat Qais participated in the Bai‘at that took place at Aqabah along with seventy Ansar. He also had the honour of participating in the Battles of Badr and Uhud.

(al-Tabaqaat-ul-Kubra, Vol. 3, p. 392, Qais bin Abi Sa’sa, Dar-ul-Kutb al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 1990)

His mother, Umaimah bint Abdul Muttalib, was one of the paternal aunts of the Holy Prophet (sa). Thus, he was a cousin of the Holy Prophet (sa). He had accepted Islam prior to the Holy Prophet (sa) going into Darul Arqam.

(Usdul Ghaaba, Vol. 3, p.89, Abdullah bin Jahsh, Darul-Fikr, 2003, Beirut).

Then, history informs us about another companion by the name of Haram (ra) bin Malhan. This youth was at the forefront of teaching the Holy Quran to the youth and others, as well as serving the Ashab-e-Sufa [companions who dwelt in mosques].

Then, there is a companion by the name of Hazrat Abbad bin Bishr, who passed away during the battle of Yamama in the eleventh year after Hijra. Hazrat Abbad bin Bishr’s title was Abu Bishr and Abu Rabi. He belonged to the tribe of Banu Abd-ul-Ash‘al. He only had one daughter, who also passed away. In Medina, he accepted Islam at the hand of Hazrat Mus‘ab bin Umair, prior to Hazrat Sa‘d bin Mu‘adh and Hazrat Usaid bin Uzair. At the time of forming bonds of brotherhood in Medina, the Holy Prophet (sa) formed a bond of brotherhood between him and Hazrat Abu Hudhaifa bin Utba. Hazrat Abbad bin Bishr participated in the battles of Badr, Uhud, Khandaq and all other battles alongside the Holy Prophet (sa). He was among those companions, who were sent by the Holy Prophet (sa) in order to execute Ka‘b bin Ashraf.

(At-Tabaqat Al-Kubra, Vol. 3, p. 336, Abbad bin Bishr, Dar-ul-Kutub Al-ilmiyyah, 1990, Beirut)

Today, I will speak about the Khulafa-e-Rashidin (Rightly Guided Caliphs) and begin with Hazrat Ali (ra) bin Abi Talib. (His full name was) Hazrat Ali bin Abi Talib bin Abdil Muttalib bin Hashim.

Hazrat Abu Ayub Ansari’s name was Hazrat Khalid (ra) and his father was Zaid bin Kulayb.

(Ali Ibn al-Athir, Usd al-Ghabah fi Ma’rifat al-Sahabah, Vol. 6, Hazrat Abu Ayub al-Ansari [Beirut, Lebanon: Dar al-Kutub al-‘Ilmiyyah, 2003], 22)

He is known by his name as well as his title. Hazrat Abu Ayub Ansari (ra) belonged to the Banu Najjar branch of the Ansar tribe of Khazraj.

One of the early Companions was Hazrat Abu Ayub Ansari (ra). He was fortunate to have received the honour of being the host of the Holy Prophet (sa) during his early days in Medina after migration. Every person desired for the Holy Prophet (sa) to stay at their home and everyone expressed this desire, requesting the Holy Prophet (sa) [for this honour] at that time.

The Holy Prophet (sa) said, “Let my camel loose. It will stop wherever Allah the Exalted desires.” Abu Ayub Ansari (ra) was fortunate that the camel stopped in front of his home. However, people were not satisfied with this. They said, “Our homes are nearby as well, please stay with us.” Upon this, the Holy Prophet (sa) drew a lot and even then, the name of Hazrat Abu Ayub Ansari (ra) came up.

(Al-Tabqat Al-Kubra Li-ibni Sa‘d, Vol. 1, p. 183, Dhikr Khuruj Rasulullah (sa), Darul Kutub Al-‘Ilmiyah, Beirut 1990)

The name of the companion who I will mention today from among the Badri companions is Hazrat Hilal (ra). His full name was Hazrat Hilal (ra) bin Umayyah Waqifi. Hazrat Hilal (ra) belonged to the Bani Waqif clan of the Aus tribe of the Ansar. His father’s name was Umayyah bin Amir and his mother’s name was Unaisah bint Hidam, who was the sister of Hazrat Kulthum (ra) bin Hidam. Kulthum (ra) bin Hidam is the companion whose house in Quba the Holy Prophet (sa) stayed upon his migration to Medina.

(Usdul Ghabah, Vol. 5, pp. 380-381, Hilal bin Umayyah (ra), Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 2003) (Ma‘rifatus Sahabah, Vol. 4, p. 383, Hadith 2995, Hilal bin Umayyah, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 2002)

Hazrat Abu Bakr’s (ra) name was Abdullah and his father’s name was Uthman bin Amir. His appellation was Abu Bakr, and Atiq and Siddiq were his titles. It is said that he was born in 573 CE, two and a half years after Aam-ul-Fil [Year of the Elephant]. As I have mentioned, Hazrat Abu Bakr’s (ra) name was Abdullah. He was from the Quraish and belonged to the tribe of Banu Taym bin Murrah. In the period of jahiliyyah [era of ignorance prior to the advent of Islam], his name was Abdul Ka‘bah, which the Holy Prophet (sa) changed to Abdullah. His father’s name was Uthman bin Amir and his appellation was Abu Quhafah. His mother’s name was Salma bint Sakhar bin Amir and her title was Umm-ul-Khair. According to one tradition, the name of his mother was Laila bint Sakhar.

(Ibn Abd al-Barr, Al-Isti‘ab fi Ma‘rifat al-Ashab, Vol. 3, Abdullah bin Abi Quhafah [Beirut, Lebanon: Dar al-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, 2002], pp. 91-92) (Ibn Saad, Al-Tabaqat al-Kubra, Vol. 3, Wa min Bani Taym bin Murrah bin Kaab [Beirut, Lebanon: Dar Ihya al-Turath al-Arabi, 1996], p. 90) (Ali Ibn al-Athir, Usd al-Ghabah fi Ma‘rifat al-Sahabah, Vol. 3, Abdullah bin Uthman [Beirut, Lebanon: Dar al-Fikr, 2003], p. 204) (Ibn Hajar al-Asqalani, Al-Isabah fi Tamyiz al-Sahabah, Vol. 4 [Beirut, Lebanon: Dar al-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, 2005], p. 145)

Hazrat Abdullah (ra) bin Makhrama’s title was Abu Muhammad, and he belonged to the Banu Aamir bin Lui tribe. He was also called Abdullah Akbar as well. He was one of the companions who accepted Islam early on. His father’s name was Makhrama bin Abdul Uzza and his mother’s name was Bahnana bint Safwan. In regard to his children, it is mentioned that one of his sons, Masahik, was the son of Zainab bint Suraqah, the wife of Hazrat Abdullah (ra) bin Makhrama.

Then, there is a companion by the name Hazrat Abu Marsad bin Qannas bin Al-Hussain Ghanwi. He passed away in the twelfth year of Hijra [migration to Medina]. According to some people, his title was Abu Hisn. He was a resident of Syria. He accepted Islam in its very early stages and migrated to Medina after seeking permission to do so. The Holy Prophet (sa) formed a bond of brotherhood between him and Hazrat ‘Ibada bin Samit.

(Sira Al-Sahaba, Shah Muin-ul-din Ahmad Nadwi, Vol. 2, pt. 2, p. 581, Dar-ul-Isha’at, Karachi), (Al-Asaba Fi Tameez Al-Sahaba, Vol. 7, p. 305, Abu Marsad Ghanwi, Dar-ul-Kutub Al-Ilmiyyah, 1995, Beirut)

The first of the Companions (ra) [of the Holy Prophet (sa)] that I will mention today is Hazrat Thabit bin Khalid Ansari. He belonged to the tribe of Banu Malik bin Najjar.

Hazrat Abu Dujana Ansari (ra) was a companion of the Prophet (sa). He accepted Islam before the migration of the Holy Prophet (sa) to Medina. He was a resident of Medina. He also had the honour of participating in the Battle of Badr alongside the Holy Prophet (sa) where he exhibited his mettle in great bravery.

His father’s name was Jabr bin Amr. He passed away in 34 AH at the age of 70. His actual name was Abdul Rahman and his title was Abu Abas. He belonged to the Ansar tribe of Banu Haritha. In the era of ignorance his name was Abdul Uzzah, however the Holy Prophet (sa) changed his name to Abdul Rahman because Uzza was the name of their idol. He took part in the Battle of Badr and all the other battles alongside the Holy Prophet (sa). He was also one of the Companions (ra) who killed Ka‘b bin Ashraf, who was a Jew.

Then, we find a mention of Hazrat Suraqa bin ‘Amr. He was an Ansari [inhabitant of Medina]. His full name is Suraqa bin ‘Amr bin ‘Atiya bin Khansaa Ansari. He passed away in Jamadi-ul-Awwal [fifth month of the lunar calendar] in the eighth year of Hijra [migration to Medina] during the battle of Mautah. His full name was Suraqa bin ‘Amr bin ‘Atiya bin Hansaa Ansari. The name of his mother was ‘Utaila bint Qais. Suraqa belonged to the renowned tribe of the Ansar, Banu Najjaar.

Next is Hazrat Abdullah bin Urfatah. He migrated to Abyssinia along with Hazrat Jafar (ra) bin Abi Talib. In a narration, Hazrat Abdullah bin Masud (ra) states, “The Messenger (sa) of Allah sent us to Negus and we numbered about eighty.”

(Musnad Ahmad bin Hanbal, Vol. 2, p. 201, Hadith no. 4400, Musnad Abdullah bin Mas’ood, Alim-ul-Kutb, Beirut, 1998).

Hazrat Murarah’s (ra) father was Rabee‘ bin Adiyy. His father’s name is also recorded as Ribee‘iy and Rabi‘ah as well. Hazrat Murarah (ra) bin Rabee‘ Amri belonged to the Amr bin Auf branch of the Aus tribe of the Ansar. According to another narration, he was from the Quza‘ah tribe, a confederate of the Banu Amr bin Auf. Quza‘ah was a well-known tribe in Arabia, who lived at a distance of ten miles from Medina, past the Valley of al-Qura. They lived to the west of Madain Saleh.

(Usdul Ghabah, Vol. 5, p. 129, Murarah bin Rabee‘ (ra), Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 2003) (Al-Isabah Fi Tamyeez Al-Sahabah, Vol. 6, p. 52, Dar-ul-Kutub al-Ilmiyyah, Beirut, 2003) (Farhang Sirat, p. 237, Zawwar Academy Publications, Karachi, 2003)

He was the son of Sakkhar bin Ummaiya. Hazrat Jabbar (ra)along with 70 Ansar [inhabitants of Medina] took the Bai‘at at Aqbah Sania. The Holy Prophet (sa) established a bond of brotherhood between him and Hazrat Miqdad (ra) bin Amr.

At the time of the Battle of Badr he was 32 years of age. The Holy Prophet (sa) would appoint him as Haris (one who assess the produce from the date trees) and would send him to Khaybar and other places.

He passed away in Medina during the era of Hazrat Usman’s Khilafat in 30 AH. He was 62 years of age at the time of his demise.

Hazrat Jabbar took part in the Battle of Badr, Uhud, Khandaq and all other battles alongside the Holy Prophet (sa).

(Al-Tabkaat-ul-Qubra Li Ibn Sa‘d, pt. 3, p. 293, Dar-e-Ihyaa, Al-Turath Al-Arabi, Beirut, 1996) (Al-Mujam Al-Kabir Li Al-Tibrani, Vol. 2, p. 270, Jabbar bin Sakkhar, Second Ediiton, Dar-ul-Hayaa, Al-Turath Al-Arabi, Beirut)